Tales of a Treated Wood Lab Tech: The Team Behind-the-Scenes

You know how important it is to look at the tags on the end of the lumber to find all types of important information, including the treating company, preservative type, appropriate end-use, third-party inspection information, and even warranty details. But did you take a moment to wonder…what goes on behind-the-scenes before that piece of pressure-treated wood makes its way onto the store shelf?  If the answer is yes, let’s grab a lab coat and take a closer look!

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Nominal Vs Actual Lumber Sizes

Softwood Lumber Sizes To the novice do it yourselfer softwood lumber sizes can be hard to understand. Why isn’t the 2×4 at the lumber yard 2 inches thick and 4 inches wide? The 4×4’s are 3 ½ x 3 ½ and the 1×6’s are ¾ of an inch thick and 5 ½ wide. The first […]

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Lumber Grade Marking History: 1940

On January 4, Luftwaffe Colonel Hermann Goring would assume control over most of the war industries in Germany – bringing with him harrowing implications for Europe during a time when World War II (as it would soon become known) was still in its early stages.

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Lumber Grade Marking History: 1939

The face of pop culture was forever changed in May of 1939 when Batman – created by artists Bill Finger and Bob Kane – made his first appearance in Detective Comics #27. He was the second such superhero of his type to make his debut in a year, with Superman hitting the newsstands for the first time in 1938.

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Lumber Grade Marking History: 1938

1937 was another banner year in the United States, both in ways that people could have predicted at the time and in many ways that they couldn’t. Early in the year, Howard Hughes set a new flight record by making his way via airplane from Los Angeles to New York City in just under seven and a half hours. In February, President Franklin D. Roosevelt proposed his plan to enlarge the Supreme Court of the United States.

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Lumber Grade Marking History: 1937

1937 was another banner year in the United States, both in ways that people could have predicted at the time and in many ways that they couldn’t. Early in the year, Howard Hughes set a new flight record by making his way via airplane from Los Angeles to New York City in just under seven and a half hours. In February, President Franklin D. Roosevelt proposed his plan to enlarge the Supreme Court of the United States.

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Lumber Grade Marking History: 1936

If you had to pick one word to describe the theme in the United States that permeated across 1936, that word would undoubtedly be “innovation.” Even though the country was still reeling from the devastating effects of the Great Depression, innovation was happening across the United States.

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Lumber Grade Marking History: 1934

At the same time, 1934 was also a period of uncertainty (and, some might say, trouble) for the industry – and for the Lumber Code Authority in general. Grade-marking was seen as an incredibly important subject, for example, but it was fully submerged in code difficulties at the time.

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1933

Lumber Grade Marking History: 1933

One of the most significant communication-related events of the early 20th century happened in March of 1933, although nobody at the time would have had any way of knowing that quite yet.
It was then that President Franklin D. Roosevelt, as a result of the Great Depression, addressed the nation for the first time during one of his famous “Fireside Chats.” Just a few days later, on March 15, the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose from 53.84 to 62.10. Despite the fact that the country was still in the throes of the Depression itself, this gain of 15.34% still marks the largest single-day percentage gain for the index in its history.

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